Russian archeologists created a 3D model of the Damascus Citadel

18 February

 

Experts from the Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences have completed work on a three-dimensional digital model of the Damascus Citadel, the press service of the institute reports.


"Specialists of the Institute for the History of Material Culture of the RAS together with the GC "GEOScan" have completed work on creating a three-dimensional digital model of the citadel of Damascus and made the model available for viewing on the Internet," the message reads.


It is noted that a 3D model of the Damascus Citadel was given to the Syrian side. Russian experts hope it will help the Syrians in the restoration of the monument. The last restoration of the Damascus Citadel started in the 1980s and is not yet complete.


"Aerial photography of the object to build a 3D model was made by the creative team of the Institute in the framework of the international conference on refugee return and reconstruction of Syria, which was held in Damascus in November 2020. Now the work to create a 3D model of the Damascus Citadel has been completed",  Deputy Director of the Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences,  head of the "Palmira" project Natalia Solovyova, whose words are quoted in the message.


Earlier it was reported that the Institute specialists have been working for some years to create a 3D model of ancient Palmyra, which collected detailed information on all the destruction to which this monument of world culture was subjected. The 3D model of Palmyra was handed over to the Syrian side.


The Damascus Citadel is one of the oldest preserved fortresses in the Middle East, the construction of which began during the Roman Emperor Diocletian (III-IV centuries). The Damascus Citadel experienced its first destruction in the 10th century. The citadel had been under construction since the 11th century when the territory was occupied by the Seljuk Turks; it was besieged by the Mongol armies in 1260, in 1401 by Tamerlane; from the beginning of the 16th century the citadel, like other territories of Syria, became part of the Ottoman Empire. It began to lose its military significance only in the 19th century. Until 1986 it was used as a prison and barracks, then its restoration began.

 

GSV "Russia - Islamic World"

Photo: Creative Commons

Based on materials from RIA Novosti